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Stop Motion Studio!

Stop Motion Studio is a powerful, easy to use app for creating stop motion movies. Stop motion is a powerful animation technique that makes static objects appear to be moving. There are many types of stop motion techniques such as: hand drawing, cut-paper, sand and claymation.
Brainstorm

When starting a project like this one it is important to make your ideas clear before you start filming.  You should consider what is the “story” you are going to tell.  Remember that you only have up to a minute in which to tell this story. Because of this, I recommend that you use simple experiences to create a short story such as the cut-paper example shown in the storyboard below. While this looks simple, it will require many shots. It’s also a good idea to limit yourself to one or two characters.

cutpaper.jpg

Storyboarding

The purpose of the storyboard is to visually plan out the entire animation. Here is where you begin to think about the “camera work” by showing every shot or important transition in the animation.


Set-ups

Once groups have decided on the story they will be telling and have created their storyboards, they need to begin gathering their props, characters and backdrops to be ready to film their animation.


Background

Backgrounds for stop motion animation can be created from just about any materials you have on hand:

  • Art materials such as: crayons, markers, construction paper, colored paper, watercolors, cardboard boxes, whiteboard, blackboards, tempera paint, clay, etc.
  • Real objects: a rock for a boulder, a branch for a tree, etc.
  • Animated background: one that changes during the course of your animation.
  • Remember, arranging a 3D space with objects in the foreground can give your animation a nice sense of depth. Make sure that your background is the same scale as your characters.


Things to Remember:

  • What is your theme or idea?
  • What sort of personality would you like to create?
  • How long do you plan for this to be? How many frames and fps is that?
  • What materials or objects will you need to collect?
  • What kind of background will you need?
Resources
STEAM on the iPad: Stop Motion Movies

DIY iPad Stand Ideas

Comments

  1. With Stop Motion Central, you have all the necessary tools to turn your Lego pieces into animated characters, bring drawings on a piece of paper to life, and, pretty much, turn any collection of static images into something vibrant. The only thing that would have made me like this app even more, would have been a drawing mode. I think this would have turned Stop Motion into an even more professional tool by giving the user the satisfaction of witnessing his own drawings being brought to life.

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  2. Stop Motion Central invite interested users to share and discuss topics on the latest trends in stop motion area, popularity in student, share your projects and get more unique ideas to make animations. Students can find the Tutorial and Help about easy animation Software, features of stop motion software, ideas from other claymation projects and other animations which is created by other students and schools.

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