Skip to main content

Keep Your Comments To Yourself?

Most of you know that creating comments in a Google Document is a valuable feature that allows teachers to provide helpful feedback to students when grading their work. You also know that retyping comments for each document is a whole lot of work.


Rather than typing each comment over and over again, some of you have created a list of comments that live in a Word, Pages or Google Doc somewhere. This is cool, but you still have to toggle back and forth between windows or tabs. This is where Google Keep comes into play.

Google Keep is integrated into Google Docs, which makes this process a breeze. There are a few easy steps you must take now, so that you can give more time in your day to that special person...you.

Using Google Keep for grading comments is so easy! Watch the video to learn how.

Google Classroom Users
Well, that's fine and dandy for those of you who aren't using Google Classroom. Here's why? Google Classroom has it's own built-in comment bank feature. The crowd goes wild! Watch the video for an explanation.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Google Classroom: Work Smarter Not Harder

Have you been thinking about saving trees by cutting back on paper usage in your classroom? If your answer is yes, you may want to consider utilizing Google Classroom. Many of our 2nd-12th grade teachers have taken the plunge and are now beginning to see the benefits. Gone are the days of lugging around back breaking crates loaded with spiral notebooks. Now, you can easily grade assignments with your mobile device, while enjoying some smooth jazz at your local coffee house. Google for Education has a site that is extremely helpful in our cause to work smarter not harder. Here's the link. Follow it if you know what's good for you.  I really love the   9 short videos  from the Teachers Lounge at the bottom of the page. They  are extremely lovely in their succinctness.  Video 1 of 9 Ok, so maybe watching videos isn't your cup of tea. Perhaps you prefer reading through material to gain deeper understanding of a new topic or skill. You're in luck! Go ahead a

50 Ways to Use Screencastify

A screencast is a cool video recording of your computer screen and usually includes audio narration and sometimes, if you're lucky, a webcam window of the radical creator of said video. You know what I'm talking 'bout. Over the past year, the Screencastify team has scoured the internet and talked to a ton of teachers in search of the best classroom screencasting ideas out there. This ebook is a collection of their favorite activities that can be implemented by any teacher. The latest version of this book at screencastify.com/ebook . And if you think that's all I've got for you, then you're horribly mistaken. Here's a link to Screencastify's tutorial page:   Screencastify Tutorial Library . How about taking a free 45-minute certification course taught by Alice Keeler explaining ways to marry Google Apps with Screencastify? 

Stop Motion Studio!

Stop Motion Studio is a powerful, easy to use app for creating stop motion movies. Stop motion is a powerful animation technique that makes static objects appear to be moving. There are many types of stop motion techniques such as: hand drawing, cut-paper, sand and claymation. Brainstorm When starting a project like this one it is important to make your ideas clear before you start filming.  You should consider what is the “story” you are going to tell.  Remember that you only have up to a minute in which to tell this story. Because of this, I recommend that you use simple experiences to create a short story such as the cut-paper example shown in the storyboard below. While this looks simple, it will require many shots. It’s also a good idea to limit yourself to one or two characters. Storyboarding The purpose of the storyboard is to visually plan out the entire animation. Here is where you begin to think about the “camera work” by showing every shot or important tra