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Keep Your Comments To Yourself?

Most of you know that creating comments in a Google Document is a valuable feature that allows teachers to provide helpful feedback to students when grading their work. You also know that retyping comments for each document is a whole lot of work.

Rather than typing each comment over and over again, some of you have created a list of comments that live in a Word, Pages or Google Doc somewhere. This is cool, but you still have to toggle back and forth between windows or tabs. This is where Google Keep comes into play.

Google Keep is integrated into Google Docs, which makes this process a breeze. There are a few easy steps you must take now, so that you can give more time in your day to that special person...you.

Using Google Keep for grading comments is so easy! Watch the video to learn how.

Google Classroom Users
Well, that's fine and dandy for those of you who aren't using Google Classroom. Here's why? Google Classroom has it's own built-in comment bank feature. The crowd goes wild! Watch the video for an explanation.


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